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Nitric oxide synthase inhibition blocks phencyclidine-induced behavioural effects on prepulse inhibition and locomotor activity in the rat.

Journal article
Authors C Johansson
D M Jackson
Lennart Svensson
Published in Psychopharmacology
Volume 131
Issue 2
Pages 167-73
ISSN 0033-3158
Publication year 1997
Published at Institute of Physiology and Pharmacology, Dept of Pharmacology
Pages 167-73
Language en
Links www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.f...
Keywords Animals, Behavior, Animal, drug effects, Dose-Response Relationship, Drug, Enzyme Inhibitors, pharmacology, Locomotion, drug effects, Male, NG-Nitroarginine Methyl Ester, pharmacology, Nitric Oxide Synthase, drug effects, Phencyclidine, pharmacology, Rats, Rats, Sprague-Dawley, Reflex, Startle, drug effects
Subject categories Basic Medicine, Pharmacology, Neuroscience

Abstract

The ability of the nitric oxide synthase inhibitor, NG-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester (L-NAME), to block the behavioural effects of the potent psychotomimetic, phencyclidine, was tested in rats using two different behavioural models. L-NAME was found to block both phencyclidine-induced disruption of prepulse inhibition of acoustic startle and phencyclidine-induced stimulation of locomotor activity. A selective action of L-NAME on the effects of phencyclidine was indicated, since L-NAME did not alter the effects of amphetamine, another potent psychotomimetic, in these behavioural models. These observations suggest that a nitric oxide-dependent mechanism may be involved in the effects of phencyclidine in the central nervous system.

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