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Serum magnesium and calcium levels in relation to ischemic stroke: Mendelian randomization study

Journal article
Authors S. C. Larsson
M. Traylor
S. Burgess
G. B. Boncoraglio
Christina Jern
K. Michaëlsson
H. S. Markus
Megastroke project of the International Stroke Genetics Consortium Megastroke project of the International Stroke Genetics Consortium
Published in Neurology
Volume 92
Issue 9
Pages e944-e950
ISSN 1526-632X
Publication year 2019
Published at Institute of Biomedicine, Department of Pathology
Pages e944-e950
Language en
Links dx.doi.org/10.1212/WNL.000000000000...
Subject categories Neurosciences

Abstract

OBJECTIVE: To determine whether serum magnesium and calcium concentrations are causally associated with ischemic stroke or any of its subtypes using the mendelian randomization approach. METHODS: Analyses were conducted using summary statistics data for 13 single-nucleotide polymorphisms robustly associated with serum magnesium (n = 6) or serum calcium (n = 7) concentrations. The corresponding data for ischemic stroke were obtained from the MEGASTROKE consortium (34,217 cases and 404,630 noncases). RESULTS: In standard mendelian randomization analysis, the odds ratios for each 0.1 mmol/L (about 1 SD) increase in genetically predicted serum magnesium concentrations were 0.78 (95% confidence interval [CI] 0.69-0.89; p = 1.3 × 10-4) for all ischemic stroke, 0.63 (95% CI 0.50-0.80; p = 1.6 × 10-4) for cardioembolic stroke, and 0.60 (95% CI 0.44-0.82; p = 0.001) for large artery stroke; there was no association with small vessel stroke (odds ratio 0.90, 95% CI 0.67-1.20; p = 0.46). Only the association with cardioembolic stroke was robust in sensitivity analyses. There was no association of genetically predicted serum calcium concentrations with all ischemic stroke (per 0.5 mg/dL [about 1 SD] increase in serum calcium: odds ratio 1.03, 95% CI 0.88-1.21) or with any subtype. CONCLUSIONS: This study found that genetically higher serum magnesium concentrations are associated with a reduced risk of cardioembolic stroke but found no significant association of genetically higher serum calcium concentrations with any ischemic stroke subtype. Copyright © 2019 The Author(s). Published by Wolters Kluwer Health, Inc. on behalf of the American Academy of Neurology.

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Denna text är utskriven från följande webbsida:
http://gu.se/english/research/publication/?publicationId=280680
Utskriftsdatum: 2019-11-17