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Orofacial pain and its relationship with oral health-related quality of life and psychological distress in middle-aged women.

Journal article
Authors Karin Bäck
Magnus Hakeberg
Ulla Wide
Dominique Hange
Lars Dahlström
Published in Acta odontologica Scandinavica
Pages 1-7
ISSN 1502-3850
Publication year 2019
Published at Institute of Odontology
Institute of Medicine, School of Public Health and Community Medicine
Pages 1-7
Language en
Links dx.doi.org/10.1080/00016357.2019.16...
www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.f...
Subject categories Dentistry

Abstract

Objective: To investigate the relationship between subjective symptoms of orofacial pain and oral health-related quality of life (OHRQoL), as well as psychological distress in population-based middle-aged women. Material and methods: The two study samples comprised 1059 women, 38 and 50 years old, in representative cross-sectional studies. Women with long-lasting, frequent pain or headaches, related to temporomandibular disorders (TMD), with moderate-to-high estimates were analysed in relation to the non-case group. OHRQoL was measured using the Oral Health Impact Profile (OHIP-5). Psychological distress was measured using the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS) and Sense of Coherence (SOC-13). Results: Women with orofacial pain (n = 82, 7.7%) had a significantly higher mean score on the OHIP-5, HADS-A and HADS-D and a lower mean score for SOC-13. In a multivariable logistic regression, orofacial pain was statistically significantly associated with poorer OHRQoL (OR = 1.2) and signs of depression (HADS-D) (OR = 2.0). A higher score for SOC-13 protected from the experience of orofacial pain (OR = 0.95). Conclusion: Orofacial pain was associated with poorer OHRQoL and signs of psychological distress. In interpreting the value of SOC, women with orofacial pain also appear to have a poorer adaptive capacity.

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