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Bronchodilator reversibility in asthma and COPD: findings from three large population studies

Journal article
Authors C. Janson
A. Malinovschi
A. F. S. Amaral
S. Accordini
J. Bousquet
A. S. Buist
G. W. Canonica
B. Dahlen
J. Garcia-Aymerich
L. Gnatiuc
M. L. Kowalski
J. Patel
W. Tan
Kjell Torén
T. Zuberbier
P. Burney
D. Jarvis
Published in European Respiratory Journal
Volume 54
Issue 3
ISSN 0903-1936
Publication year 2019
Published at Institute of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Community Medicine, Section of Occupational and environmental medicine
Language en
Links dx.doi.org/10.1183/13993003.00561-2...
Keywords nitric-oxide levels, lung-function, fev1, responsiveness, obstruction, validity, time, fvc, Respiratory System
Subject categories Respiratory Medicine and Allergy

Abstract

Bronchodilator response (BDR) testing is used as a diagnostic method in obstructive airway diseases. The aim of this investigation was to compare different methods for measuring BDR in participants with asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and to study to the extent to which BDR was related to symptom burden and phenotypic characteristics. Forced expiratory volume in 1 s (FEV1) and forced vital capacity (FVC) were measured before and 15 min after 200 mu g of salbutamol in 35 628 subjects aged >= 16 years from three large international population studies. The subjects were categorised in three groups: current asthma (n=2833), COPD (n=1146) and no airway disease (n=31 649). Three definitions for flow-related reversibility (increase in FEV1) and three for volume-related reversibility (increase in FVC) were used. The prevalence of bronchodilator reversibility expressed as increase FEV1 >= 12% and 200 mL was 17.3% and 18.4% in participants with asthma and COPD, respectively, while the corresponding prevalence was 5.1% in those with no airway disease. In asthma, bronchodilator reversibility was associated with wheeze (OR 1.36, 95% CI 1.04-1.79), atopy (OR 1.36, 95% CI 1.04-1.79) and higher exhaled nitric oxide fraction, while in COPD neither flow- nor volume-related bronchodilator reversibility was associated with symptom burden, exacerbations or health status after adjusting for pre-bronchodilator FEV1. Bronchodilator reversibility was at least as common in participants with COPD as those with asthma. This indicates that measures of reversibility are of limited value for distinguishing asthma from COPD in population studies. However, in asthma, bronchodilator reversibility may be a phenotypic marker.

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