To the top

Page Manager: Webmaster
Last update: 9/11/2012 3:13 PM

Tell a friend about this page
Print version

Fertility-sparing surgery… - University of Gothenburg, Sweden Till startsida
Sitemap
To content Read more about how we use cookies on gu.se

Fertility-sparing surgery for treatment of non-epithelial ovarian cancer: Oncological and reproductive outcomes in a prospective nationwide population-based cohort study

Journal article
Authors G. Johansen
Pernilla Dahm-Kähler
C. Staf
A. Flöter Rådestad
K. A. Rodriguez-Wallberg
Published in Gynecologic Oncology
Volume 155
Issue 2
Pages 287-293
ISSN 0090-8258
Publication year 2019
Published at Institute of Clinical Sciences
Pages 287-293
Language en
Links dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.ygyno.2019.08....
Keywords Fertility-sparing surgery, Early-stage non-epithelial ovarian cancer, Overall survival, Progression-free survival, Conception-rate, Live birth, Assisted reproductive technology treatment, Obstetrical outcome
Subject categories Cancer and Oncology, Obstetrics, Gynecology and Reproductive Medicine

Abstract

Objective: To compare the oncologic outcome of women who underwent fertility-sparing surgery (FSS) vs. radical surgery (RS) for treatment of NEOC in a prospective, nationwide, population-based study and report on the reproductive outcomes in women after FSS. Methods: Using the Swedish Quality Register for Gynecological Cancer, we identified all women ages 18–40 treated with either FSS or RS for stage I NEOC between 2008 and 2015. Progression-free survival (PFS) and overall survival (OS) rates were compared using the Kaplan-Meier method. Data on use of assisted reproductive technology (ART) treatments and obstetrical outcomes after FSS were extracted from the National Quality Register for Assisted Reproduction (Q-IVF) and the Swedish Medical Birth Register. Results: During the study period, 73 women ages 18–40 received a stage I NEOC diagnosis. The majority, 78% (n = 57), underwent FSS. The 5-year OS rate, regardless of surgical approach, was 98%. There were no statistical differences between OS and PFS rates in women treated with FSS, compared to RS. Recurrences were more common after RS than FSS: 12.5% (2/16) vs. 3.5% (2/57), respectively. Following FSS, 11 women gave birth to 13 healthy children (all conceived naturally). Additionally, 12% of the women in the cohort developed infertility and received ART treatment (n = 7). Conclusion: FSS is not associated with worse oncologic outcomes than RS in young women with early stage NEOC. The prognosis was excellent in both groups, with an OS of 98%. Natural fertility was maintained in women treated with FSS, only 12% required ART treatment. © 2019

Page Manager: Webmaster|Last update: 9/11/2012
Share:

The University of Gothenburg uses cookies to provide you with the best possible user experience. By continuing on this website, you approve of our use of cookies.  What are cookies?