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Weight gain and blood pressure.

Journal article
Authors Johan Sundström
Lars Lind
Erik Lampa
Oskar Angerås
Erasmus Bachus
Göran Bergström
Bo Carlberg
Gunnar Engström
Jan E Engvall
Mats Eriksson
Bruna Gigante
Emil Hagström
Ola Hjelmgren
Jan-Håkan Jansson
Tomas Jernberg
Maria Mannila
Fredrik H Nyström
Jonas Oldgren
Margaretha Persson
Anette Sandström
Eva Swahn
Stefan Söderberg
Kjell Torén
Carl Johan Östgren
Annika Rosengren
Published in Journal of hypertension
Volume 38
Issue 3
Pages 387-394
ISSN 1473-5598
Publication year 2020
Published at Institute of Medicine, School of Public Health and Community Medicine
Institute of Medicine, Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine
Pages 387-394
Language en
Links dx.doi.org/10.1097/HJH.000000000000...
www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.f...
Subject categories Clinical Medicine

Abstract

Although the causality of the obesity--hypertension association is established, the potential for prevention is not. We hypothesized that weight gain between early adulthood and mid-life is associated with higher mid-life blood pressure.We investigated the hypothesis using a large contemporaneous population-based mid-life cohort of men and women aged 50-64 years. Recalled body weight at age 20 years was self-reported, and mid-life body weight and office blood pressures were measured in accordance with a detailed protocol.On average, men had gained 14.9 (95% CI 14.6-15.2) kg of weight, and women 14.6 (95% CI 14.4-14.9) kg, between age 20 years and the mid-life examination, corresponding to 0.40 (95% CI 0.39-0.41) kg/year for men and women. Both weight at age 20 years and weight at the mid-life examination were associated with mid-life blood pressures. On average, a 10 kg weight increase between age 20 years and mid-life was associated with 2.2 (95% CI 0.9-3.5) mmHg higher systolic and 1.7 (95% CI 0.9-2.5) mmHg higher diastolic mid-life blood pressure in men, and 3.2 (2.5-4.0) mmHg higher systolic and 2.4 (1.9-2.9) mmHg higher diastolic mid-life blood pressure in women. Mid-life weight was more closely associated than weight at age 20 years with mid-life blood pressure. For a given mid-life weight, blood pressure was higher in persons with higher weight gain from age 20 years.In sum, weight gain between early adulthood and mid-life was associated with higher mid-life blood pressure. The magnitude of the association indicates a potentially great public health impact of strategies to prevent weight gain throughout adulthood.

Page Manager: Webmaster|Last update: 9/11/2012
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