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Speech and swallowing symptoms associated with Parkinson's disease and multiple sclerosis: a survey.

Journal article
Authors Lena Hartelius
P. Svensson
Published in Folia phoniatrica et logopaedica : official organ of the International Association of Logopedics and Phoniatrics (IALP)
Volume 46
Issue 1
Pages 9-17
ISSN 1021-7762
Publication year 1994
Published at Institute of Odontology
Institute of Selected Clinical Sciences, Department of Logopedics and Phoniatrics
Pages 9-17
Language en
Links www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.f...
Keywords Adult, Aged, Combined Modality Therapy, Deglutition Disorders, diagnosis, therapy, Disability Evaluation, Female, Humans, Male, Middle Aged, Multiple Sclerosis, diagnosis, therapy, Parkinson Disease, diagnosis, therapy, Speech Disorders, diagnosis, therapy, Speech Therapy, Voice Disorders, diagnosis, therapy
Subject categories Medical and Health Sciences, Dentistry

Abstract

A survey of approximately 460 patients with Parkinson's disease (PD) or multiple sclerosis (MS) shows that speech and swallowing difficulties are very frequent within these groups. Seventy percent of the PD patients and 44% of the MS patients had experienced impairment of speech and voice after the onset of their disease. Forty-one percent of the PD patients and 33% of the MS patients indicated impairment of chewing and swallowing abilities. The speech disorder was regarded as one of their greatest problems by 29% of the PD patients and by 16% of the MS patients. Only a small number of patients, 3% of the PD and 2% of the MS group, had received any speech therapy.

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